Android P Will Block Apps That Use The Camera Without Telling You About It
Android P Will Block Apps That Use The Camera Without Telling You About It

We all know very well that new details on the next version of Android are coming up gradually before its official announcement – due to the Google I/O developer conference which will take place in May. However, now according to the latest reports, the next version of Android, of course, the Android P will simply block apps that use the camera without telling you about it.

Android P Will Block Apps That Use The Camera Without Telling You About It

Details on the next version of Android are coming up gradually before its official announcement – due to the Google I/O developer conference which will take place in May.

This time, a change in the AOSP (Android Open Source Project) shows that the system will prevent background apps from accessing the camera. The idea is to prevent malicious apps from taking compromising photos when the screen is turned off.

The XDA Developers explains that when the camera detects that a service app is idle, Android P closes access to the camera. The app may even try, but the system will continue to prevent it from taking pictures or recording videos.

To continue using the camera, the app needs to implement a service in the foreground. Since Android Oreo, this means displaying a notification saying that it is running.

In earlier versions of Android, apps can use the camera without warning. In 2014, developer Szymon Sidor demonstrated how it is possible to take pictures and record videos without the user knowing: simply adjust the camera’s display to 1 pixel, making it virtually invisible. This works even in the background and with the screen off.

Of course, this can be problematic for apps like Cerberus, designed to track down a stolen cell phone. It allows you to take photos of the thief with the front camera but would have to display a notification on Android P that the camera is active.

According to Bloomberg, Android P will support folding screens or “horns”; will allow you to integrate Google Assistant commands into third-party apps; and will bring about an expressive change in the interface.

In addition, it must adopt the Brotli compression algorithm for faster OTA updates; you can connect to printers using Wi-Fi Direct; and will have native support for Bluetooth hearing aids.

So, what do you think about this? Simply share all your views and thoughts in the comment section below.



AUTHOR

Manpreet Singh is young Entrepreneur who is managing Tech Viral & Also an aspiring blogger and Chief Editor for Tech Viral. He is an Experienced Blogger, SEO Expert, Digital Marketer, Certified Web Developer & Social Media Expert.