Chrome Warns You When Typing Anything Into Non-Secure Sites
Chrome Warns You When Typing Anything Into Non-Secure Sites

We all know that Google seems to be committed to making the web to migrate to secure connections (HTTPS). Hence, Google announced recently that, starting with Chrome 62 version, slated to be released in October, it will show an “unsecured” website message whenever the user types anything on a page that does not have Encryption.

Chrome Warns You When Typing Anything Into Non-Secure Sites

The tech giant Google seems to be committed to making the web to migrate to secure connections (HTTPS). The company announced recently that, starting with Chrome 62 version, slated to be released in October, it will show an “unsecured” website message whenever the user types anything on a page that does not have Encryption.

Changes to discourage unencrypted HTTP usage are being gradual in Chrome. In browser version 56, the tech giant Google started to display an alert icon (“i”) next to the address bar whenever the user was on an HTTP site. The explicit “Not Secure” message was only displayed on pages that had formed with sensitive data.

However, “passwords and credit cards are not the only data types that should be private,” according to the company. “Any type of data that users type on websites should not be accessible to others on the network, so starting with version 62, Chrome will display the ‘Not secure’ warning when users enter information into HTTP sites,” says the tech giant Google.

The change also applies to anonymous tabs, where the tech giant Google will be even more rigid: the message will appear even if the user does not enter any information. This is necessary because, according to the tech giant Google, when people open a site in private mode, they raise their privacy expectations – however, anonymous browsing does not prevent others on the network from seeing what you’re accessing.

Warning - Chrome Warns You When Typing Anything Into Non-Secure Sites

The company already warns that in the future, without specifying a deadline, will display the message “Not secure” for all pages other than HTTPS. So, if you’re a developer then you might know that Let’s Encrypt provides TLS certificates for free, and you do not even have to pay annuity (and even then, prices are lower than ever).



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