Apple: Expect Some Color Shifts And Burn-In On Your New iPhone X
Apple: Expect Some Color Shifts And Burn-In On Your New iPhone X

We all know very well that the tech giant Apple’s new iPhone X is the first model that uses an OLED screen since until now the tech giant Apple had only used this technology in the Apple Watch and the Touch Bar of the MacBook Pro. However, recently, the tech giant Apple stated that “expect some color shifts and burn-in on your new iPhone X”.

Apple: Expect Some Color Shifts And Burn-In On Your New iPhone X

The new flagship of the tech giant Apple, of course, I am talking about the iPhone X has begun to reach users, and one of its most outstanding features is its large Super Retina OLED screen of 5.8-inch.

The new iPhone X is the first model that uses an OLED screen since until now the tech giant Apple had only used this technology in the Apple Watch and the Touch Bar of the MacBook Pro. The OLED technology has important advantages, such as a high contrast and a thinner panel, but it also has some limitations.

The tech giant Apple says in one of its support pages that users may notice a certain change in the color tone when viewing the iPhone X from extreme angles, due to the characteristics of OLED screens.

“When you look at an angled OLED screen, you may notice small changes in color and tone. This is typical of OLED screens and totally normal. With extended use, OLED displays can also show small visual changes.”

The tech giant Apple also indicates that the iPhone X has the best OLED screen in the industry, but those persistence phenomena or “burn” of the image can occur under certain circumstances.

“This is also normal and may include “image persistence” or “image burn” in which remains of an image remain on the screen even after a new image has appeared.”

The tech giant Apple recommends keeping automatic brightness on, reducing automatic lock times and always using the latest software to extend the life of the OLED screen.

Finally, the tech giant Apple also advises against displaying static images with the maximum brightness level for long periods of time on the iPhone X screen.

“This can occur in more extreme cases, for example, when the same high-contrast image is displayed continuously for long periods of time. We have designed the Super Retina screen to be the best in the industry when it comes to reducing the effects of “image burn” of OLED screens.”

Of course, the problem is much less pronounced than in the Google model. The difference? We have to turn the panel a lot more to appreciate the defect in Apple’s mobile, while the Pixel only needs a minimum change of viewing angles to change the tonality.

So, what do you think about this? Simply share your views and thoughts in the comment section below.



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