Gmail Confidential Mode Misleading Users With Security Claims
Gmail Confidential Mode Misleading Users With Security Claims

We all know very well that when the tech giant Google introduced the latest Gmail update, it brought several important features that improve the use of this service. Among the various novelties present, there was the possibility of sending confidential messages. However, now according to the latest reports, the tech giant Google’s well-known email service, Gmail’s confidential mode is misleading users with the security claims.

Gmail Confidential Mode Misleading Users With Security Claims

When the tech giant Google introduced the latest Gmail update, it brought several important features that improve the use of this service. Among the various novelties present, there was the possibility of sending confidential messages.

An analysis of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) now reveals that this new method is not so transparent, as it abuses Gmail users and is misleading.

Most people know how confidential Gmail works. These messages, which never actually leave Gmail, can only be read by the correct and authenticated recipients, they can be destroyed when the sender wants to destroy them and can not be printed or sent to other recipients.

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This sense of security is apparently false, according to an analysis by the EFF, this security feature of Gmail simply abuses its users, using measures that are not really protecting users and collect even more information from them.

The first negative point that is pointed to the confidential mode in Gmail is in the transmission of messages, which are not encrypted between the sender and receiver. This gives the tech giant Google access to the messages at any time and can read what is exchanged.

Second, it associated with the system of access to messages through a simple link shared between the 2, opens the door to simple phishing attacks to create, with the associated security problems. Users will rely on incoming messages and access links that they do not verify.

Finally, and in a point more affectionate to personal information, this system requires the recipient’s phone number should be provided to the tech giant Google. Only in this way can it receive the message access code by SMS. This looks like a correct mechanism but is giving the tech giant Google access to more information, probably provided without the recipient’s permission.

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These are points that the tech giant Google must address in the near future, so you will not be exposed to issues with this new security feature and protection of sent messages. Again, in Google services, a supposed novelty turns out to become something that is monitoring users and gathering information about them.

So, what do you think about this? Simply share all your views and thoughts in the comment section below.



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